Pgh partner

[Local] - ‘Volunteering is powerful’: Light of Life Rescue Mission partners with NBC Sports to provide Thanksgiving sustenance Pgh Post-Gazette

2020.11.27 00:51 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - ‘Volunteering is powerful’: Light of Life Rescue Mission partners with NBC Sports to provide Thanksgiving sustenance Pgh Post-Gazette

[Local] - ‘Volunteering is powerful’: Light of Life Rescue Mission partners with NBC Sports to provide Thanksgiving sustenance Pgh Post-Gazette submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.11.23 13:25 TELMxWILSON Fresh tracks alert! Here we go again with all the new quality Drum & Bass releases. Enjoy the music :) [+weekly updated Spotify playlist] New Music Monday! (Week 47)

 
Weekly updated Spotify Playlist H2L: New Drum & Bass
Retroactive Spotify Playlist (1-4week old tracks) H2L: Retroactive New DnB
Soundcloud Playlist H2L: New Drum & Bass Soundcloud
Youtube Playlist H2L: New Drum & Bass Youtube
Last Week's list http://reddit.com/jv6dx0
 

Picks Of The Week (by u/lefuniname)

1. DC Breaks, Eva Lazarus - We Never Slow Down [RAM Records]

Recommended if you like: Loadstar, Friction, Kove
Artists more often than not undergo a transformation over time. Trying out new styles, sounds or genres even, just getting out of the comfort zone a bit. Some are able to apply their signature sounds to new styles, while some others are not as fortunate. DC Breaks is definitely a case of the former group.
The London-based duo Dan Havers and Chris Page has been active since around 2005, but their chapter is far from being Done or Closed. In fact, this year they started their 15-year anniversary project DCXV. A very Difficult-to-understand and Confusing name, since they are not even close to being 615 years in the game. Anyway. For this Delightful Celebration they gathered a whole bunch of new DC Breaks originals and remixes of Downright Classics from the likes of Technimatic and Skantia. Fun fact: One of these originals, Back For More, was used by Arsenal for their game recap!
Their newest entry in this series is a Dynamic Collaboration with rudegirl Eva Lazarus called We Never Slow Down, a most fitting title. Straight out the gate I have to mention just how fun the vocals are. The instrumental itself is already quite energetic, but Eva just gives the whole track so much more energy with her vocal performance. Will be a Direct Competitor with Enter The Warrior for most hype and fun vocals this year for me!
As some of you know, DC Breaks had started a collaborative project with Loadstar a few years ago called OPPOSITION. Apparently they had a whole album laid out, but had to scrap most of the Dear Cooperations, because the project was cancelled. All of it? Not quite! Turns out the instrumental for Never Slow Down is actually taken from OPPOSITION's track Higher. So there's still hope for the rest of the album, in one form or another!
Anyway, I'm very glad this instrumental got to see the light of day, because this is just such a good tune. Paired with the incredible Eva Lazarus it instantly became one of my favorites this year. Great stuff!
Okay I'm gonna take a break from all the DC puns now. A DC Break, if you will. Hehe. Some other dancefloor-y things that happened this week: - Fox Stevenson - All Eyes On Me - Rude Boy, Nami - Illusion (Mage Remix) - Annix, A Little Sound - Overload (I just count that as Dancefloor) - ReauBeau, Ekko & Sidetrack - Higher (Freaks & Geeks Remix) - Subsonic - Need Me - TREi - Space & Time / My Eyes - Droptek - Back 2 U - Idun Nicoline - Lost Without You (Boxplot Remix) - Ex Duty - Occulation - Exploid - Nobody Like You

2. Unknown Artist - Jungle Ride EP [Fokuz Recordings]

Recommended if you like: Macca & Loz Contreras, Lana Del Ray, Jorja Smith
Next up, we have my favorite new artist: Unknown Artist!
Yeah yeah, I know that's not actually their name. Every now and then dutch liquid powerhouse Fokuz Recordings contacts the producers of some of the best liquid bootlegs out there and releases the ones they get the permission for under the Unknown Artist moniker. For legal reasons, I guess. That's also how Edlan's bootleg of Need To Feel Loved, as heard in Pendulum's recent Spitbank Fort livestream, got to be released!
It's not always easy or even possible to find out who the "original" bootlegger was. For instance, the first track of this new Unknown Artist EP, Jungle, is definitely a bootleg of the original Wankelmut and Emma Louise track My Head Is A Jungle. But god knows who did the bootleg. In any case, whoever it is did a phenomenal job. It's such an incredibly melancholic vibe and my god do I love those. I've probably listened to it 50 times by now. Usually I would look the exact number of listens up on my last.fm account but apparently "Unknown Artist" tracks are not scrobbled. Sad times.
Speaking of melancholic: Next up we have a bootleg of Lana Del Ray - Ride, the queen of melancholy. As just a casual listener of Pop (i.e. only when I listen to radio and my phone is dead), I never expected her nostalgy-fueled gloomy vibes to work at a drum and bass tempo. The sad piano notes just makes the vibe complete. For this one I could actually find the artist, it's UK-based producer Macca!
Speaking of Macca, he and his partner in crime Loz Contreras are the creators another track on this EP: Blue Lights, a bootleg of Jorja Smith's track with the same name. I've said it after listening to High Contrast's Emmy-nominated remix of one of her tracks and I'll say it here too: We need more DnB tracks with Jorja Smith on the vocals. The dreamy vocals are complemented perfectly by Macca and Contreras' wonderful instrumental. Especially the breakdown in the middle of the track when Jorja's vocals are put front and centre is just perfect.
After all this melancholy Mr. Unknown Artist presents us with one last, more uplifting bootleg of NxWorries - Lyk Dis. I really don't know much about the artists involved in the original or the bootleg here, but one thing is for sure: It's fun as hell! A nice hiphop r&b vibe with some fun-sounding but in reality super sexual lyrics and some fast drums, what more do you even need?
All in all probably one of my favorite EPs of the year, which I honestly didn't expect before listening to it.
Some more liquid stuff that happened this week: - Brainwork - Had It All (just got on Spotify so I had to shout it out again) - Nu:Tone - Sweeter / Do It Right - Snse, Frankie Valli - Goodbyes (released last week, but only got around to it this week) - Bank - Breathless EP

3. The Clamps, Opsen - Illegal Instinct [Code Smell Music]

Recommended if you like: Burr Oak, Nais, Teddy Killerz
You know what this review thread needs? Some Neurofunk.
Good thing french neurofunk royalty The Clamps and Opsen have new music for us! What did you say? You don't know who they are? First of all, shame on you. Second of all, okay that was maybe a bit harsh, not everyone knows everyone. Let me introduce you.
The Clamps, also known as Julien Carbo (yes just one person), is not just very confusingly named, but more importantly also one of the most ridiculous neurofunk producers the scene has to offer. His first few releases as The Clamps were more Hardcore or Crossbreed oriented, but from 2015 on his productions went more into a drum and bass direction with releases on the french label Kosenprod and Prolix's Trendkill Records. He went on to release on labels like Mainframe, Titan Records and Eatbrain, to name a few. As a Toulousian himself, the Toulouse-based Kosenprod was still his home though. He went on to form a few side-projects you might have heard about, namely The Third Colony (for more atmospheric electronic stuff) and Burr Oak, a collaboration project with Opsen. Hey that's the other guy!
You might also know Opsen, a frenchman himself, from his work in the french neurofunk trio Signs. After four years of being signed with Signs, he resigned from the group, with all signs pointing to a solo career. Just like his fellow frenchman The Clamps he mostly released on Trendkill and Kosenprod in the following years. Additionally, he worked on a few collaborative efforts with ex-Signs member Le Lutin, as Cecil Hotel, and, you guessed it, with The Clamps as Burr Oak.
But this is no Burr Oak release, this is a double single with one track from them each. This is also not a release on Kosenprod or Trendkill, no no. This release is on the newly established label Code Smell Music. Even though it was founded just a few months ago by danish producer Bytecode, also known as one part of Instinkt, the young label has seen some promising releases so far. From Disphonia to Transforma to The Prophecy to, well, The Clamps and Opsen, they have proven to have quite great taste in what they shine a spotlight on.
Speaking of, let's talk about the actual release for a bit here. Opsen's track Global Instinct takes no prisoners at all, the brrr-per-minute meter is off the chart. As is becoming customary in new neurofunk releases, the breakdown switches over to a 4x4 beat that instantly makes me feel like I'm in a bunker in Berlin. The Clamps goes a similar route on Illegal. In typical Clamps fashion the song features variation upon variation in its drop that all try to top eachother with their ridiculousness. I love it. Halfway through the track the song also switches to a 4x4 beat, while a sample of an interview with 69db, also known as part of the Spiral Tribe crew, about electronic music of the 90s can be heard in the background. A nice nod to Julien's roots. After that it's back to straight tunage. Highly illegal indeed.
All in all, sick as hell.
Other happenings in the neurofunk world this week: - Tobax - Steinhagel VIP (was on Beatport earlier, but didn't get around to it yet) - Billain - Codename EP
And also deep/techy stuff: - IMANU - Fuji - Droptek - Devoid (Levela Remix) - DLR, Break - Hit The Target / NADS - Emperor - Rangefinder - GEST, Quadrant, Iris - Sequential - CELO - Learn To Fly / Break It - QUIX, Juelz - Chicane (Kumarion Remix)

4. Various Artists - Yo Bro LP [Drum Army]

Recommended if you like: Bredren, Was A Be, Rizzle or any of the 20+ featured artists
Breaking news: We have chosen a new Hidden Gems Of The Week™!
This week's pick is the Yo Bro compilation on the up-and-coming label Drum Army. This album is the third entry in the Yo Bro saga, also known as the best-named release series ever, after the Yo Bro EP and the Collab Bro collab EP in 2019. For those who don't know, Drum Army is a relatively new swiss label showcasing some of the best that the local, but also global, deep drum and bass scene has to offer. As is often the case with labels, Drum Army first started out as an event series way back in 2014 and only became a full-fledged label in 2017. Just one year later, they were already nominated as best newcomer label in the Drum & Bass Arena Awards. And that nomination didn't come out of nowhere. With releases from artists like Monrroe, OaT, Nemy or Invadhertz, they have certainly earned that high praise.
For this project they have reached out to artists from 8 different countries on three different continents, from insider tips like Smuskind or missledz to more established artists like Zombie Cats or Invadhertz. With that much diversity, you will certainly find something you like in there! Provided you like deep dnb at all, I guess. But even a good friend of mine who doesn't like that style of dnb at all found something in there they like, so who knows.
We (well, I) don't have all day for this so I'll quickly go through my four favorites:
First off, Smuskind. The german dnb duo have always been sort of my favorites on the label and to my delight they have contributed not just one but two tracks on this massive project. The first one is Bräd, a track full of weird whistle samples presented in a rhythm that is so catchy I honestly can't enough of it. The bounciness of it all makes it seem like they have listened to a lot Bass House tracks recently and I'm here for it. It's so bouncy in fact that even the protagonist of the music video is a big bouncy ball! The second track from Smuskind is a collaboration with Invadhertz called Ghosts and takes us into the deepest depths of the deep sea. I'm fairly certain this tune would cause an earthquake when played on a system.
Next up we have Felix Raymon, another german newcomer from the Ruhr area, presenting us his 2020 with Bomsh on vocal duty. The track is full of psytrance influences, from the occasional "bwoarm" in the background to the 4x4 rhythms during the verses of Bomsh, who's flow and voice gives me huge MC Mota vibes. Definitely one of the more unique tracks on the LP! Sidenote, check out Felix Raymon in general, he's one of my favorite underrated artists right now.
Last but not least there's Zombie Cats! Okay who am I kidding, they are not unknown at all. I'm just a huge fan okay? Their contribution Creatures is yet another sick roller with high production value everywhere. Honestly, they've pumped out a crazy amount of tracks this year (and it's not even over yet!) and they still manage to deliver consistently high quality. Best year ever for a Zombie Cats fan. This one even features a nice half-time drop in the second half, for all of you halftime lovers!
All in all, I give this LP Yo out of Bro stars. In other words, I love it.
Hidden Gems - Hydrae - CONSTANT EP - Archaea - System Malfunction / Can You Feel It - Ex Duty - Occulation - Embers Of Light - Everything Changes LP - Streetz Of Rage - Orbital Decay EP  

New Releases

submitted by TELMxWILSON to DnB [link] [comments]


2020.11.19 12:26 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Lawrenceville robotics company partners with J&J to automate parts of medical supply chain Pgh Post-Gazette

[Local] - Lawrenceville robotics company partners with J&J to automate parts of medical supply chain Pgh Post-Gazette submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.11.17 23:56 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Pittsburgh, partner encouraging women to seek spots on city's boards and commissions Pgh Post-Gazette

[Local] - Pittsburgh, partner encouraging women to seek spots on city's boards and commissions Pgh Post-Gazette submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.11.12 22:56 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Pitt, CMU partner with nonprofits, school districts to provide free internet access to city households Pgh Post-Gazette

[Local] - Pitt, CMU partner with nonprofits, school districts to provide free internet access to city households Pgh Post-Gazette submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.11.02 16:45 budget-cuts To do another cycle of IVF, or not to do another cycle of IVF - what would you do?

Hi community - I'm feeling at a loss regarding what to do next and would love the groups' thoughts on what they would do if in my situation. I'm also speaking to my RE, but would love other opinions from women who have experienced infertility firsthand.
I am a 33-year-old single woman whose #1 goal in life is to have a family.
Last year, a routine fertility screen revealed I have DOR, and that my levels (1.1 AMH, AFC of 3-7 depending on the day) were those of a woman much older than I was. Not being actively TTC, I had no way of knowing how difficult trying to become pregnant might be for me. The news was shocking, and life-changing, as it is for every woman who receives it. I was devastated, but immediately snapped into wanting to take action to fight for any chance of success.
I have been single for about 5 years (whole 'nother story) with no prospects in sight, and given how important having kids is to me, I went ahead and used a bonus from work to purchase donor sperm and go through an IVF cycle. None of this was covered by insurance, so I ended up spending almost $30k on one cycle. I have a pretty good salary, so it was more an inconvenience than a life-shattering amount of debt, but I had to open several credit cards regardless to fully finance the procedure, and will be paying them off for years to come. I'm also still paying down a ton of student loan debt, and a car, and the weight of my monthly expenses is pretttty crushing. So that's finance stuff.
The results of my IVF were: 3 eggs retrieved, 3 fertilized, 3 5-day embryos, and 2 embryos tested PGH normal, with 1 "mystery" embryo (unclear results from testing). So I froze all 3. My RE said the chances that I would have a successful pregnancy from those 2-3 were "very good." But, of course, not guaranteed.
Going through IVF on my own, during covid, was an awful experience. Physically taxing and emotionally devastating, even if the end results were great. I decided to take time off from TTC to recover and process the experience.
Now, I am debating where to go from here, and feel like I need to "sh*t or get off the pot" and make a decision one way or another.
One option is to be content with what I have. Go back on birth control (which makes me feel/look/act a lot better) and trust that either 1/3 of my embryos will result in a baby, or I'll find a partner and be able to naturally conceive at some point within the next few years. The pro of this is both emotional and financial, but the con is my anxiety will continue to rage increasingly as time goes on.
Another option is to pursue a round of egg freezing. Pro is it would preserve optionality in the event that I do find a partner down the line, and is less costly than IVF. The con here is given the low volume of eggs I'm producing, it would be risky to freeze eggs and then have to unfreeze them later to fertilize.
Another option still is to do another IVF cycle. Take on another $30k of debt, but potentially end up with more banked embryos and thus a higher likelihood of birthing a bio child (and theoretically reduced anxiety!).
I'm cognizant that I don't exactly have a lot of time left, given my age and DOR, so it feels like a decision I need to make in the next few months. I really don't feel financially/emotionally prepared to do another IVF cycle, but I do not want to look back in a couple years and regret not banking while I still had the chance.
Would welcome any thoughts, or ways of reframing my thinking, or just support in general. Appreciate you all. <3
submitted by budget-cuts to infertility [link] [comments]


2020.10.30 20:21 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - City to partner with Allegheny Health Network in social services, violence prevention iniative Pgh Post-Gazette

[Local] - City to partner with Allegheny Health Network in social services, violence prevention iniative Pgh Post-Gazette submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.10.28 16:14 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Franklin Regional, local church partner to provide ‘Holiday Help’ to families Pgh Tribune-Review

[Local] - Franklin Regional, local church partner to provide ‘Holiday Help’ to families Pgh Tribune-Review submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.10.04 21:12 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Child advocate, horse rescue ranch partner to promote healing Pgh Tribune-Review

[Local] - Child advocate, horse rescue ranch partner to promote healing Pgh Tribune-Review submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.09.30 00:16 PixburghOrange Mobile App Contractor

Hello PGH Reddit --
Local yinzer here in need of some recommendations. A business partner and I run a quickly growing website and we are in the market to develop a relatively cheap/simple mobile app to add to our product offering.
I've had a number of calls with local mobile app development firms and it seems like they are more interested in taking on biggeless simplistic projects.
Does anyone on here know of an independent "contractor" that has the capability to develop a relatively simple mobile app?
Appreciate any input you may have!!
submitted by PixburghOrange to pittsburgh [link] [comments]


2020.09.21 14:12 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Business] - Founder of GM electric truck partner quits amid allegations Pgh Tribune-Review

[Business] - Founder of GM electric truck partner quits amid allegations Pgh Tribune-Review submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.09.14 16:42 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Business] - TikTok owner picks Oracle over Microsoft as U.S. tech partner Pgh Tribune-Review

[Business] - TikTok owner picks Oracle over Microsoft as U.S. tech partner Pgh Tribune-Review submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.09.08 20:09 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Op-Ed] - Rick Dearborn: Keep the pressure on our trading partners Pgh Post-Gazette

[Op-Ed] - Rick Dearborn: Keep the pressure on our trading partners Pgh Post-Gazette submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.08.18 23:39 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Housing Authority, Comcast partner to provide low-income families with internet access Pgh Post-Gazette

[Local] - Housing Authority, Comcast partner to provide low-income families with internet access Pgh Post-Gazette submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.08.11 03:03 midflinx Don't build HSR bridges and infrastructure this way

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-08-10/california-bullet-train-bridge-snafu
A series of errors by contractors and consultants on the California bullet train venture caused support cables to fail on a massive bridge, triggering an order to stop work that further delayed a project already years behind schedule, the Los Angeles Times has learned.
The bridge is longer than two football fields and is needed to shuttle vehicles over the future bullet train right of way and existing BNSF freight tracks in Madera County.
Authorities have yet to finalize a plan to repair the bridge. Late last year, crews installed temporary steel supports to prevent it from collapsing.
Hundreds of pages of documents obtained by The Times under a public records request show the steel supports snapped as a result of neglect, work damage, miscommunications and possible design problems.
“It is a horrible sequence of mistakes,” said Robert Bea, emeritus professor of civil engineering at UC Berkeley and co-founder of its Center for Catastrophic Risk Management.
The bridge is part of a 31-mile stretch of construction under contract to Tutor Perini Corp., a major construction firm based in Sylmar. The company declined to answer a series of written questions or to make a statement.
The bridge is part of Gov. Gavin Newsom’s plan for a 171-mile, $20.4-billion bullet train operation from Merced to Bakersfield.
The bridge work began in 2016 and was supposed to be completed in 12 months. Relocation of underground utilities became a problem, as there were schedule glitches, according to rail authority and Madera County officials. Months turned into years, during which thousands of residents were forced to take long detours around the site. Then last year came a series of blunders.
High-strength steel strands supporting the 636-foot-long structure began to snap on Oct. 22, one after another. Ultimately, 23 of the strands, which are comprised of seven individual wires each, broke unexpectedly, according to rail authority documents and officials. The order to stop work was issued Nov. 4.
A forensic engineering analysis, obtained by The Times, found that the strands corroded from rainwater that had leaked into the internal structure of the bridge and then broke. The analysis was prepared for Tutor Perini by the forensic engineering firm Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates of Northbrook, Ill.
Garth Fernandez, the rail authority’s interim director for the central region, said he was confident — based on the analysis, computations by designers and an inspection by Tutor — that once the bridge is repaired it would have its designed load-carrying capacity. But Bea, a member of the National Academy of Engineering, says a more comprehensive examination of the structure is needed to ensure its safety.
The problems on the Road 27 bridge reveal project management hitches that have dogged the bullet train for years. The California High-Speed Rail Authority has five separate layers of consultants and contractors on the bridge. Any one of them could have identified a long series of errors, but it appears no one did so.
Apart from those problems, the state issued a variety of nonconformance reports on the company’s work, including an instance where a crane boom hit part of the bridge construction, contaminated concrete was found in a bridge support pier, incorrect alignment occurred on a bridge pier, and steel dowel rods were missing in concrete, among other items.
Fernandez said the nonconformance reports showed that the authority’s quality control program was working, though he acknowledged, “We don’t like where we are right now.” The authority is moving to strengthen its oversight of the project with additional engineers borrowed from Caltrans, he said.
The California High-Speed Rail Authority has long wrestled with its dependence on consultants and outside experts, with a 2018 state audit faulting the agency for being overly reliant on these private interests.
Gov. Gavin Newsom told The Times in 2019 that he was “going to get rid of a lot of consultants,” but they remain integral to the project, according to engineering specialist and officials involved with bullet train planning.
“The layers on this project are onerous,” said William Ibbs, a UC Berkeley civil engineering professor who has consulted on high-speed-rail projects around the world. “The levels of administration and review are very unusual. No one company is going to be wholly to blame if something goes wrong, because they can spread the blame around.”
“It isn’t getting any better,” said an executive at one firm working on the project, who asked not to be identified because he was not authorized to speak to the news media. “It is such a pillage of the taxpayers.”
Some outside engineers compare the situation to the 2018 Miami International University disaster, in which multiple players failed to recognize defects in a pedestrian bridge that collapsed onto a roadway. On the Madera County project, there has been no bridge failure or casualties, but in Miami, six people were killed. Eight were injured.
“One of the criticisms of the Florida bridge collapse was the lack of responsibility up and down the chain of command,” said USC civil engineering professor Gregg Brandow. After reviewing the forensic report on the Road 27 bridge, Brandow said, “You have a hard time finding the actual chain of command. I don’t think you know who was responsible.”
On the Madera County bridge project, the reporting lines are complex. Tutor Perini is the so-called design builder of the bridge, though its team member Parsons actually designed the bridge.
Tutor’s work is overseen by an independent check engineer, the New York-based firm STV. And Parsons’ work is partly reviewed by an independent site engineer, also STV.
Above STV is a so-called project and construction manager, a joint venture of Bay Area firms PGH Wong Engineering and Harris & Associates, which manages the day-to-day contract.
Above the joint venture known as Wong Harris is the state’s so-called rail delivery partner, Montreal-based WSP, which has broad oversight of the concept, design and execution of the project.
Finally, there is the state rail authority, a relatively small agency with problems of worker turnover. The authority currently has 220 employees but 51 vacancies and no permanent board chairman. Its chief engineer retired a few months ago but is on board as a post-retirement annuitant.
In this tangle of organizations, lines of communication are strained, which clearly played a role in the failure of the bridge supports.
The bridge over Road 27 is known as a post-tension structure, a fairly common type of design used in buildings, parking structures and bridges. High-strength steel strands are run inside ducts and then pulled to extremely high tension. After tension is added, the ducts are pumped full of grout to protect the steel strands.
The Road 27 bridge has five ducts in each of four girders, and the plan was to tension and grout three of them before the concrete roadway was poured and then apply tension to the strands in the other two afterward.
Before any strands were installed, the plan required that the ducts meet an air pressure test to assure that the grout would not leak. The pressure test failed to meet specifications, according to state documents. The failure might have been related to the design that had the ducts recessed from the ends of each girder segment, Fernandez said. There was some concern that if they tried to grout three of the ducts, the grout would migrate and fill the other two ducts, preventing installation of strands later.
Under its contract, Tutor was supposed to grout the ducts within 10 days of the strands’ installation in April. Tutor’s design firm, Parsons, wrote a “field change notice” that called for a delay in the grouting until all the strands in all of the ducts were installed, Fernandez said.
It was submitted to STV, where it sat. Fernandez and Christine Inouye, the rail authority’s director of engineering, said in an interview that STV never sent that notice to Wong Harris or to the rail authority.
“In hindsight, we all should have been aware of it,” said Fernandez. “Sometimes in a project of this complexity, these things happen.”
In April, the rail authority issued a notice of noncompliance to Tutor, saying its failure to grout the ducts violated its contract.
An internal audit by the rail authority, finalized on June 1 and obtained by The Times under its public records request, found that 72% of STV’s contract requirements that were examined had nonconformances. The specific findings faulted the company for not being on site at critical times, failing to file required reports and not having qualified personnel on the job, as well as other inadequacies.
STV said in a statement that it was working with the authority and Tutor Perini on the “safety of all structures” and referred questions to the rail authority.
The decision to delay grouting might have been OK if vent caps on the ducts had not been damaged and it had not rained. But crews that installed rebar on the highway deck apparently damaged those caps, and it appears that nobody, including STV or Wong Harris or Tutor Perini, noticed. When crews later drained the ducts after the failure occurred, water “poured out” of one duct for five minutes, according to the forensic report.
The report found that the strands failed as a result of “stress corrosion cracking.” Brandow noted that the strands had begun to corrode even before they were installed, according to the forensic report. He said even minor corrosion on strands could initiate cracking.
The repair plan for the bridge calls for all the strands in all of the four girders to be replaced, Fernandez said. Tutor had started to replace some of the strands shortly after they broke and was told it had to replace those a second time, according to a letter. The plan is currently being reviewed by BNSF headquarters, which has the right to examine any work that occurs over its tracks.
Fernandez said Tutor would have to pay for the cost of the repairs.
submitted by midflinx to highspeedrail [link] [comments]


2020.08.01 05:12 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Murrysville library, recreation department partner on wetlands ‘Storywalk’ Pgh Tribune-Review

[Local] - Murrysville library, recreation department partner on wetlands ‘Storywalk’ Pgh Tribune-Review submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.07.25 22:18 steelmanfallacy Age Gap Relationship Survey Results - Part #2

This survey wasn't specific to older female age gap relationships, but it does include data on them so we thought we'd share here.
We are an AGR couple...Nadia, the girlfriend (F27), and Fynn, the boyfriend (M49). We recently created a survey because we were curious about age gap relationships (we're obviously in one ourselves). We love reading the stories in this sub and elsewhere on Reddit and we're both a bit nerdy so we decided to see if we could collect some data anonymously and help learn if there are some common patterns that we could find in AGRs. We also love stories so we put in a bit of an effort to collect anecdotes and data or as we like to say, "anecdata".
A couple of days ago we published the first of three posts of the survey results which provided details of the demographics of the survey respondents. In this post, we're going to talk about the heart of the survey data. We asked questions about the happiness of the survey respondents and we asked the respondent to estimate the happiness of their partner. We also asked them to guess how long the relationship would last and a few other questions like have they met their respective families, do the families approve, etc. The goal in this analysis is to better understand how happy AGR couples are and to get a sense of what drives that happiness (or at least what is correlated with it!).
We are planning to do a third post which will share a bunch of the comments and free text responses which are amazing. We asked questions like, "What's your story?" and "What advice do you have for new AGR couples." There are some gems we'll be sharing soon.

Assumptions

But first, some disclaimers. Neither of us are researchers trained in the arts of survey design or even data analysis. We're nerds who love this stuff and are always learning more, and we're sure we've made tons of mistakes and we look forward to you all pointing them out so we can learn even more.
All of the respondents came from Reddit subs (here and a handful of others). This wasn't a randomized survey. Because we added questions over a couple of days, we don't have answers to all of the questions for all of the surveys. Of the 526 complete surveys, only 193 answered all 27 questions. You'll see for some of the questions we added later, where we have somewhere between 193 and maybe 300 responses, we *assume* that those responses are representative of the entire panel of respondents. We could be wrong on that. We were not able to control for duplicates, so it's possible some people submitted multiple surveys. I'm sure there are other assumptions...we'll update this section as appropriate.
For more on the demographics of the respondents, check out our first post.

AGR Happiness Results

Before the big reveal, a bit on how we "measured" happiness. I'm sure someone more knowledgeable in survey design could do a better job, but we used a "slider" in Survey Monkey. We set the scale to go from "very unhappy" on the left to "very happy" on the right. The middle of the scale was labeled "neutral." Here's what the question looked like. Behind the scenes, Survey Monkey has 100 positions that the slider can be in. The respondent drags the slider to some place on the scale and then Survey Monkey records a number from 0 (very unhappy) to 100 (very happy). Neutral would be 50.
Nadia and I have a bunch of discussion came up with five "ranges" for the happiness score (even though this wasn't on the label). Yes, we are just making this up, but it seem relatively intuitive to us based on previous surveys we've taken. So the ranges are:
We did think about adding some ranges to the scale in Survey Monkey, but they only allowed us to label the ends and the middle. So the two additional ranges we added even though they're unlabeled.
So if we look at the happiness rating for all 526 respondents, the average is 85, or solidly in the "very happy" range. We asked the same question about the respondent's partner and they estimated their partner's happiness as 86, or essentially the same.
We were kind of surprised at how happy everyone seemed. Our first thought was that this might be the result of new relationship energy (NRE) and that a lot of the subreddit members were in the early stages of their relationship with high NRE and therefore high happiness.
So we looked at just the happiness of couples that reported being together for 3 or more years. There were 156 of these long term couples, and the respondent happiness was reported as 83, essentially the same! In fact, the partner's happiness for these long term couples was higher, an average of 88! So much for the NRE theory!
We also looked at couples with younger male partners and discovered that they were slightly happier (87) than younger female couples (85) although less optimistic about the duration of the relationship (67% for >5 years for younger male couples compared to 78% for >5 years for younger female couples). Bear in mind that we only had 36 younger male couple respondents so take that with a grain of salt.
We looked at people of color and their happiness (we had to group together all non-white ethnicity responses to get a large enough sample). Of the 63 respondents who identified as a POC, the average happiness was 81 compared to 85 of the average of 85 for all respondents.

What Makes Couples Unhappy?

We don't know! But we can say a bit about what is correlated with less happiness. We started by taking a look at the couples that reported lower happiness to see if we could find any common themes. Of the 526 respondents, 50 reported being unhappy or neutral (the happiness score less than 60) or about 10% of the total responses. One question we asked was how long do you think the relationship will ask. For these "Unhappies" the 44% said they would breakup within a year and surprisingly 44% thought they would be together more than 5 years. 24% of the Unhappies were married or engaged to be married, but still that means another 20% were just dating but expected to be together for at least 5 years despite their unhappiness.
More than one third of the Unhappies had not had their partner meet their family. And probably more importantly, the family approval rating for the Unhappies was just 44, the bottom end of neutral.
We should probably step back a second and talk about the family approval question. We used the same slider question type that we used for happiness. The scale goes from "strong disapproval" on the left to "strong approval" on the right. In the middle is "neutral". So the scale goes from 0 (strong disapproval) to 100 (strong approval). 50 is neutral. We used the same ranges:
This makes sense to us. A big driver of happiness is whether or not the couple meets their partner's families and the overall approval levels that they feel from heir respective families.
We also looked at the couples who indicated they were unhappy (happiness <40). There were 19 and their average happiness was 19, which would put them at the high end of the "unhappy" part of our scale. Five of those couples were engaged or married. The respondents family had an approval rating of 37 ("disapproval") and the average of their assessment of their partner's happiness was 61 (just above neutral). Two thirds of these couples live together. We think that the family approval is the big standout, but with such small numbers it is really hard to say anything with confidence. In part #3 of the post, we'll dive more deeply into the word of mouth and we find that is more revealing.

Other Drivers of Happiness

We looked at other factors to see if they had any effect on happiness. One that we were curious about was the living situation. We're in a long distance relationship so we wondered if that had an effect. But looking at the 57 couples in LDRs, we saw that the overall happiness score for them was 86, slightly happier than everyone else!
We wondered what the happiness was for couples with a large age gap. We had 53 couples with age gaps over 30 years, and their happiness was reported as 82. We compared this to the 67 couples that reported a 5-10 year age gap and a happiness of 89. It does seem that couples with smaller age gaps are slightly (about 10%) happier.
We also looked at what we call "never mets" which are a couple where neither has met the other's family members (not even one) and do not expect that they will. These never mets reported an average happiness score of 71, which is considerably lower than the average of 89 for non-never mets. That's a more than 25% cut in happiness. Pretty dramatic.
It's also interesting to look at the non-never-mets and their outlook. They seem super optimistic. 86% predict their relationship will last more than 5 years.
We looked at happiness to see if it varied by how the couple met. How couples met did not seem to have an effect with the exception of sugar couples who were slightly less happy than the other (81 versus 86). Perhaps there are some lingering missed expectations from the early days of the relationship? Whatever gaps there were, it does seem that the long term effect is negligible.
We looked at the effect the respondent was the younger or older partner in the couple on their happiness and it had none (85 versus 86). We looked at the gender of the respondent and found that males were slightly less happy than females (83 versus 86).

Conclusions

This is a hard one. The biggest correlate with overall couple happiness that we've found so far in these data is whether they are connected to each other's families and their perception of their families' approval of the relationship. But the upshot is that even if both families disapprove, the happiness rating only decreases to 78 compared to 90. Put another way, couples where both families disapproved were still at the high end of "happy" and couples where both families approved were in the middle of the "very happy" range. Bottom line is that families matter but they're not everything. Speaking from personal experience, we feel lucky in that both of our families strongly approve of our relationship. Something we didn't ask in the survey is about friends' approval. For us that is also very important and helpful in our relationship and that's something we'd like to explore further.
In Part #3 of the survey results, we'll dive deep into the stories from the survey. In the meantime, we'd love to hear how family approval has affected your happiness. Are there things you have done that increased (or decreased) your family's approval? We also wonder if all "family" is created equal. For example, does parental approval for the younger partner have a bigger influence than, say, child or ex-spouse approval for the older partner? We'd love to hear your stories and even questions. We think the biggest impact of this survey can be the dialog that it generates to help new and old AGR couples better understand their feelings and what actions they can take to improve their overall happiness.
Stay tuned for Part #3 coming soon!
Thanks for reading and for all the comments!
Nadia & Fynn
PS. If we launched a website with surveys and results like this, what else would you enjoy reading on that website?
submitted by steelmanfallacy to CougarsAndCubs [link] [comments]


2020.07.25 20:59 steelmanfallacy Age Gap Relationship Survey Results - Part #2

We are an AGR couple...Nadia, the girlfriend (F27), and Fynn, the boyfriend (M49). We recently created a survey because we were curious about age gap relationships (we're obviously in one ourselves). We love reading the stories in this sub and elsewhere on Reddit and we're both a bit nerdy so we decided to see if we could collect some data anonymously and help learn if there are some common patterns that we could find in AGRs. We also love stories so we put in a bit of an effort to collect anecdotes and data or as we like to say, "anecdata".
A couple of days ago we published the first of three posts of the survey results which provided details of the demographics of the survey respondents. In this post, we're going to talk about the heart of the survey data. We asked questions about the happiness of the survey respondents and we asked the respondent to estimate the happiness of their partner. We also asked them to guess how long the relationship would last and a few other questions like have they met their respective families, do the families approve, etc. The goal in this analysis is to better understand how happy AGR couples are and to get a sense of what drives that happiness (or at least what is correlated with it!).
We are planning to do a third post which will share a bunch of the comments and free text responses which are amazing. We asked questions like, "What's your story?" and "What advice do you have for new AGR couples." There are some gems we'll be sharing soon.

Assumptions

But first, some disclaimers. Neither of us are researchers trained in the arts of survey design or even data analysis. We're nerds who love this stuff and are always learning more, and we're sure we've made tons of mistakes and we look forward to you all pointing them out so we can learn even more.
All of the respondents came from Reddit subs (here and a handful of others). This wasn't a randomized survey. Because we added questions over a couple of days, we don't have answers to all of the questions for all of the surveys. Of the 526 complete surveys, only 193 answered all 27 questions. You'll see for some of the questions we added later, where we have somewhere between 193 and maybe 300 responses, we *assume* that those responses are representative of the entire panel of respondents. We could be wrong on that. We were not able to control for duplicates, so it's possible some people submitted multiple surveys. I'm sure there are other assumptions...we'll update this section as appropriate.
For more on the demographics of the respondents, check out our first post.

AGR Happiness Results

Before the big reveal, a bit on how we "measured" happiness. I'm sure someone more knowledgeable in survey design could do a better job, but we used a "slider" in Survey Monkey. We set the scale to go from "very unhappy" on the left to "very happy" on the right. The middle of the scale was labeled "neutral." Here's what the question looked like. Behind the scenes, Survey Monkey has 100 positions that the slider can be in. The respondent drags the slider to some place on the scale and then Survey Monkey records a number from 0 (very unhappy) to 100 (very happy). Neutral would be 50.
Nadia and I have a bunch of discussion came up with five "ranges" for the happiness score (even though this wasn't on the label). Yes, we are just making this up, but it seem relatively intuitive to us based on previous surveys we've taken. So the ranges are:
We did think about adding some ranges to the scale in Survey Monkey, but they only allowed us to label the ends and the middle. So the two additional ranges we added even though they're unlabeled.
So if we look at the happiness rating for all 526 respondents, the average is 85, or solidly in the "very happy" range. We asked the same question about the respondent's partner and they estimated their partner's happiness as 86, or essentially the same.
We were kind of surprised at how happy everyone seemed. Our first thought was that this might be the result of new relationship energy (NRE) and that a lot of the subreddit members were in the early stages of their relationship with high NRE and therefore high happiness.
So we looked at just the happiness of couples that reported being together for 3 or more years. There were 156 of these long term couples, and the respondent happiness was reported as 83, essentially the same! In fact, the partner's happiness for these long term couples was higher, an average of 88! So much for the NRE theory!
We also looked at couples with younger male partners and discovered that they were slightly happier (87) than younger female couples (85) although less optimistic about the duration of the relationship (67% for >5 years for younger male couples compared to 78% for >5 years for younger female couples). Bear in mind that we only had 36 younger male couple respondents so take that with a grain of salt.
We looked at people of color and their happiness (we had to group together all non-white ethnicity responses to get a large enough sample). Of the 63 respondents who identified as a POC, the average happiness was 81 compared to 85 of the average of 85 for all respondents.

What Makes Couples Unhappy?

We don't know! But we can say a bit about what is correlated with less happiness. We started by taking a look at the couples that reported lower happiness to see if we could find any common themes. Of the 526 respondents, 50 reported being unhappy or neutral (the happiness score less than 60) or about 10% of the total responses. One question we asked was how long do you think the relationship will ask. For these "Unhappies" the 44% said they would breakup within a year and surprisingly 44% thought they would be together more than 5 years. 24% of the Unhappies were married or engaged to be married, but still that means another 20% were just dating but expected to be together for at least 5 years despite their unhappiness.
More than one third of the Unhappies had not had their partner meet their family. And probably more importantly, the family approval rating for the Unhappies was just 44, the bottom end of neutral.
We should probably step back a second and talk about the family approval question. We used the same slider question type that we used for happiness. The scale goes from "strong disapproval" on the left to "strong approval" on the right. In the middle is "neutral". So the scale goes from 0 (strong disapproval) to 100 (strong approval). 50 is neutral. We used the same ranges:
This makes sense to us. A big driver of happiness is whether or not the couple meets their partner's families and the overall approval levels that they feel from heir respective families.
We also looked at the couples who indicated they were unhappy (happiness <40). There were 19 and their average happiness was 19, which would put them at the high end of the "unhappy" part of our scale. Five of those couples were engaged or married. The respondents family had an approval rating of 37 ("disapproval") and the average of their assessment of their partner's happiness was 61 (just above neutral). Two thirds of these couples live together. We think that the family approval is the big standout, but with such small numbers it is really hard to say anything with confidence. In part #3 of the post, we'll dive more deeply into the word of mouth and we find that is more revealing.

Other Drivers of Happiness

We looked at other factors to see if they had any effect on happiness. One that we were curious about was the living situation. We're in a long distance relationship so we wondered if that had an effect. But looking at the 57 couples in LDRs, we saw that the overall happiness score for them was 86, slightly happier than everyone else!
We wondered what the happiness was for couples with a large age gap. We had 53 couples with age gaps over 30 years, and their happiness was reported as 82. We compared this to the 67 couples that reported a 5-10 year age gap and a happiness of 89. It does seem that couples with smaller age gaps are slightly (about 10%) happier.
We also looked at what we call "never mets" which are a couple where neither has met the other's family members (not even one) and do not expect that they will. These never mets reported an average happiness score of 71, which is considerably lower than the average of 89 for non-never mets. That's a more than 25% cut in happiness. Pretty dramatic.
It's also interesting to look at the non-never-mets and their outlook. They seem super optimistic. 86% predict their relationship will last more than 5 years.
We looked at happiness to see if it varied by how the couple met. How couples met did not seem to have an effect with the exception of sugar couples who were slightly less happy than the other (81 versus 86). Perhaps there are some lingering missed expectations from the early days of the relationship? Whatever gaps there were, it does seem that the long term effect is negligible.
We looked at the effect the respondent was the younger or older partner in the couple on their happiness and it had none (85 versus 86). We looked at the gender of the respondent and found that males were slightly less happy than females (83 versus 86).

Conclusions

This is a hard one. The biggest correlate with overall couple happiness that we've found so far in these data is whether they are connected to each other's families and their perception of their families' approval of the relationship. But the upshot is that even if both families disapprove, the happiness rating only decreases to 78 compared to 90. Put another way, couples where both families disapproved were still at the high end of "happy" and couples where both families approved were in the middle of the "very happy" range. Bottom line is that families matter but they're not everything. Speaking from personal experience, we feel lucky in that both of our families strongly approve of our relationship. Something we didn't ask in the survey is about friends' approval. For us that is also very important and helpful in our relationship and that's something we'd like to explore further.
In Part #3 of the survey results, we'll dive deep into the stories from the survey. In the meantime, we'd love to hear how family approval has affected your happiness. Are there things you have done that increased (or decreased) your family's approval? We also wonder if all "family" is created equal. For example, does parental approval for the younger partner have a bigger influence than, say, child or ex-spouse approval for the older partner? We'd love to hear your stories and even questions. We think the biggest impact of this survey can be the dialog that it generates to help new and old AGR couples better understand their feelings and what actions they can take to improve their overall happiness.
Stay tuned for Part #3 coming soon!
Thanks for reading and for all the comments!
Nadia & Fynn
PS. If we launched a website with surveys and results like this, what else would you enjoy reading on that website?
submitted by steelmanfallacy to AgeGapRelationship [link] [comments]


2020.07.25 20:49 steelmanfallacy Age Gap Relationship Survey Results - Part #2

We are an AGR couple...Nadia, the girlfriend (F27), and Fynn, the boyfriend (M49). We recently created a survey because we were curious about age gap relationships (we're obviously in one ourselves). We love reading the stories in this sub and elsewhere on Reddit and we're both a bit nerdy so we decided to see if we could collect some data anonymously and help learn if there are some common patterns that we could find in AGRs. We also love stories so we put in a bit of an effort to collect anecdotes and data or as we like to say, "anecdata".
A couple of days ago we published the first of three posts of the survey results which provided details of the demographics of the survey respondents. In this post, we're going to talk about the heart of the survey data. We asked questions about the happiness of the survey respondents and we asked the respondent to estimate the happiness of their partner. We also asked them to guess how long the relationship would last and a few other questions like have they met their respective families, do the families approve, etc. The goal in this analysis is to better understand how happy AGR couples are and to get a sense of what drives that happiness (or at least what is correlated with it!).
We are planning to do a third post which will share a bunch of the comments and free text responses which are amazing. We asked questions like, "What's your story?" and "What advice do you have for new AGR couples." There are some gems we'll be sharing soon.

Assumptions

But first, some disclaimers. Neither of us are researchers trained in the arts of survey design or even data analysis. We're nerds who love this stuff and are always learning more, and we're sure we've made tons of mistakes and we look forward to you all pointing them out so we can learn even more.
All of the respondents came from Reddit subs (here and a handful of others). This wasn't a randomized survey. Because we added questions over a couple of days, we don't have answers to all of the questions for all of the surveys. Of the 526 complete surveys, only 193 answered all 27 questions. You'll see for some of the questions we added later, where we have somewhere between 193 and maybe 300 responses, we *assume* that those responses are representative of the entire panel of respondents. We could be wrong on that. We were not able to control for duplicates, so it's possible some people submitted multiple surveys. I'm sure there are other assumptions...we'll update this section as appropriate.
For more on the demographics of the respondents, check out our first post.

AGR Happiness Results

Before the big reveal, a bit on how we "measured" happiness. I'm sure someone more knowledgeable in survey design could do a better job, but we used a "slider" in Survey Monkey. We set the scale to go from "very unhappy" on the left to "very happy" on the right. The middle of the scale was labeled "neutral." Here's what the question looked like. Behind the scenes, Survey Monkey has 100 positions that the slider can be in. The respondent drags the slider to some place on the scale and then Survey Monkey records a number from 0 (very unhappy) to 100 (very happy). Neutral would be 50.
Nadia and I have a bunch of discussion came up with five "ranges" for the happiness score (even though this wasn't on the label). Yes, we are just making this up, but it seem relatively intuitive to us based on previous surveys we've taken. So the ranges are:
We did think about adding some ranges to the scale in Survey Monkey, but they only allowed us to label the ends and the middle. So the two additional ranges we added even though they're unlabeled.
So if we look at the happiness rating for all 526 respondents, the average is 85, or solidly in the "very happy" range. We asked the same question about the respondent's partner and they estimated their partner's happiness as 86, or essentially the same.
We were kind of surprised at how happy everyone seemed. Our first thought was that this might be the result of new relationship energy (NRE) and that a lot of the subreddit members were in the early stages of their relationship with high NRE and therefore high happiness.
So we looked at just the happiness of couples that reported being together for 3 or more years. There were 156 of these long term couples, and the respondent happiness was reported as 83, essentially the same! In fact, the partner's happiness for these long term couples was higher, an average of 88! So much for the NRE theory!
We also looked at couples with younger male partners and discovered that they were slightly happier (87) than younger female couples (85) although less optimistic about the duration of the relationship (67% for >5 years for younger male couples compared to 78% for >5 years for younger female couples). Bear in mind that we only had 36 younger male couple respondents so take that with a grain of salt.
We looked at people of color and their happiness (we had to group together all non-white ethnicity responses to get a large enough sample). Of the 63 respondents who identified as a POC, the average happiness was 81 compared to 85 of the average of 85 for all respondents.

What Makes Couples Unhappy?

We don't know! But we can say a bit about what is correlated with less happiness. We started by taking a look at the couples that reported lower happiness to see if we could find any common themes. Of the 526 respondents, 50 reported being unhappy or neutral (the happiness score less than 60) or about 10% of the total responses. One question we asked was how long do you think the relationship will ask. For these "Unhappies" the 44% said they would breakup within a year and surprisingly 44% thought they would be together more than 5 years. 24% of the Unhappies were married or engaged to be married, but still that means another 20% were just dating but expected to be together for at least 5 years despite their unhappiness.
More than one third of the Unhappies had not had their partner meet their family. And probably more importantly, the family approval rating for the Unhappies was just 44, the bottom end of neutral.
We should probably step back a second and talk about the family approval question. We used the same slider question type that we used for happiness. The scale goes from "strong disapproval" on the left to "strong approval" on the right. In the middle is "neutral". So the scale goes from 0 (strong disapproval) to 100 (strong approval). 50 is neutral. We used the same ranges:
This makes sense to us. A big driver of happiness is whether or not the couple meets their partner's families and the overall approval levels that they feel from heir respective families.
We also looked at the couples who indicated they were unhappy (happiness <40). There were 19 and their average happiness was 19, which would put them at the high end of the "unhappy" part of our scale. Five of those couples were engaged or married. The respondents family had an approval rating of 37 ("disapproval") and the average of their assessment of their partner's happiness was 61 (just above neutral). Two thirds of these couples live together. We think that the family approval is the big standout, but with such small numbers it is really hard to say anything with confidence. In part #3 of the post, we'll dive more deeply into the word of mouth and we find that is more revealing.

Other Drivers of Happiness

We looked at other factors to see if they had any effect on happiness. One that we were curious about was the living situation. We're in a long distance relationship so we wondered if that had an effect. But looking at the 57 couples in LDRs, we saw that the overall happiness score for them was 86, slightly happier than everyone else!
We wondered what the happiness was for couples with a large age gap. We had 53 couples with age gaps over 30 years, and their happiness was reported as 82. We compared this to the 67 couples that reported a 5-10 year age gap and a happiness of 89. It does seem that couples with smaller age gaps are slightly (about 10%) happier.
We also looked at what we call "never mets" which are a couple where neither has met the other's family members (not even one) and do not expect that they will. These never mets reported an average happiness score of 71, which is considerably lower than the average of 89 for non-never mets. That's a more than 25% cut in happiness. Pretty dramatic.
It's also interesting to look at the non-never-mets and their outlook. They seem super optimistic. 86% predict their relationship will last more than 5 years.
We looked at happiness to see if it varied by how the couple met. How couples met did not seem to have an effect with the exception of sugar couples who were slightly less happy than the other (81 versus 86). Perhaps there are some lingering missed expectations from the early days of the relationship? Whatever gaps there were, it does seem that the long term effect is negligible.
We looked at the effect the respondent was the younger or older partner in the couple on their happiness and it had none (85 versus 86). We looked at the gender of the respondent and found that males were slightly less happy than females (83 versus 86).

Conclusions

This is a hard one. The biggest correlate with overall couple happiness that we've found so far in these data is whether they are connected to each other's families and their perception of their families' approval of the relationship. But the upshot is that even if both families disapprove, the happiness rating only decreases to 78 compared to 90. Put another way, couples where both families disapproved were still at the high end of "happy" and couples where both families approved were in the middle of the "very happy" range. Bottom line is that families matter but they're not everything. Speaking from personal experience, we feel lucky in that both of our families strongly approve of our relationship. Something we didn't ask in the survey is about friends' approval. For us that is also very important and helpful in our relationship and that's something we'd like to explore further.
In Part #3 of the survey results, we'll dive deep into the stories from the survey. In the meantime, we'd love to hear how family approval has affected your happiness. Are there things you have done that increased (or decreased) your family's approval? We also wonder if all "family" is created equal. For example, does parental approval for the younger partner have a bigger influence than, say, child or ex-spouse approval for the older partner? We'd love to hear your stories and even questions. We think the biggest impact of this survey can be the dialog that it generates to help new and old AGR couples better understand their feelings and what actions they can take to improve their overall happiness.
Stay tuned for Part #3 coming soon!
Thanks for reading and for all the comments!
Nadia & Fynn
PS. If we launched a website with surveys and results like this, what else would you enjoy reading on that website?
submitted by steelmanfallacy to AgeGap [link] [comments]


2020.07.20 06:42 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Pitt student engineers, Habitat for Humanity partner to make video for Bolivian village Pgh Tribune-Review

[Local] - Pitt student engineers, Habitat for Humanity partner to make video for Bolivian village Pgh Tribune-Review submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.07.04 02:12 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Robert Levin, new partners, revive family’s furniture business in the midst of pandemic Pgh Tribune-Review

[Local] - Robert Levin, new partners, revive family’s furniture business in the midst of pandemic Pgh Tribune-Review submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]


2020.06.30 18:42 AutoNewspaperAdmin [Local] - Kelly-Strayhorn Theater partners with East Liberty arts organizations for virtual fundraiser Pgh Tribune-Review

[Local] - Kelly-Strayhorn Theater partners with East Liberty arts organizations for virtual fundraiser Pgh Tribune-Review submitted by AutoNewspaperAdmin to AutoNewspaper [link] [comments]